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godsgirl
02-20-2014, 07:25 AM
Hey Ladies!
My day home kids have all of a sudden started running through the house this last month and a half and they are driving me bananas! Any tips that you guys have used to get these wild animals to stop running around? (lol!) I've tried timeouts, stopping them and saying 'gentle feet, slow down, etc' but as soon as I'm done they are at it again. They are 18 months, 2.5, 3, 3.5, and 7. I know that we are all getting antsy from being stuck inside this winter but holy camoly I can't get them to stop.
Thanks in advance

Judy Trickett
02-20-2014, 07:34 AM
I give them one warning. After that I stop them, mid-run, and plunk them down on the floor wherever I caught them and they have to sit there for an undetermined amount of time. No talking, no playing. Just sitting. It typically works. And I also give them my stink eye look.

If I have a super repeat offender I will ensure that at some point when I plunk them down I start a super fun activity with the rest of the children and finish it before that child can get up from the floor. They quickly learn it is better to WALK than miss out on the fun.

5 Little Monkeys
02-20-2014, 07:43 AM
My kids have also started recently running around which they have never done before( 2,2 and 2.5, 2.5). I agree, I think it's the weather and being cooped up in the house for the past couple months. This week we have gotten outside daily and I noticed the running in the house has decreased big time.

I do the same as Judy. One warning and than they are put on timeout. It hasn't really been working though lol. I will bring out the trampoline if it gets really bad and that always stops the running!!

Depending on your size of space, you could also move things around so it makes running around harder.

ttremble88
02-20-2014, 07:49 AM
I have runners as well. They play this game called 'competitions' where they have races in different forms (walking, crab crawling, scooting, 'speed walking' ect) It drives me nuts but I have learned that in the winter they need to blow off the extra energy some how. So they are allowed to play this game following afternoon snack while I tidy up a bit. The rule is that if I need to give more then 2 warnings (either for running, yelling, arguing ect) the competitions end and everyone needs to partake in a quiet time activity (puzzles, reading, coloring, board game ect) However, if I notice that a single particular child is the one causing all of the warnings, then they are separated for a given amount of time.

Busy ECE mommy
02-20-2014, 08:22 AM
I like to reposition big items in my playroom like the train table/sensory bin/art table etc so that there is no straight path for running. If they continually do it, they sit, or miss out on the regular activities for a few minutes.

bright sparks
02-20-2014, 08:40 AM
I think we have had a really rough winter so it's likely a cabin fever related problem. Why not schedule into your daily routine a set gross motor time and let them know that running is not okay but what else can we do and play copy cat. Have the older ones lead the group in copying. As for the 7 year old, my instinct would be to have a good harsh talk with them. They know better and should absolutely not be misbehaving after being told numerous times. They should be setting an example. Tut tut. I think sometimes the gentle approach doesn't work after a while and a short sharp snap really gives them a reality check that this kind of behaviour is unacceptable. Obviously I'm not telling you to shout at them, but a quick raised voice saying "ENOUGH" and a dissapointed stern expression IMO is much more acceptable in response to negative behaviour than a nicey nice voice. I would have them all stop in their tracks and sit where they stop for an undetermined amount of time every single time this happened and then furthur express my upset by telling their parents in front of them at pick up time that they were not listening well today and how dissapointed you are. Obviously the youngest ones are not going to be bothered by that but your 3 years plus might. And that age group are setting an example to the younger ones so need a different approach to discipline.

AmandaKDT
02-20-2014, 08:40 AM
I allow controlled running, if that makes sense. They aren't allowed to run around the main floor of my house, but I let them run laps around the sofa I have in the basement, or I supervise them in doing relay race kind of stuff (like doing crab walks or hopping like bunnies). I also have those bouncing balls with the handles that they can sit on and bounce around. Can't expect these little ones to not be allowed to burn off that excess energy, especially with being unable to spend little or no time outside.

mickyc
02-20-2014, 08:42 AM
I don't usually have this problem until the end of the day when everything is cleaned up. I do warnings, time outs etc. I can't wait for spring so we can go outside for hours and hours!

bright sparks
02-20-2014, 09:12 AM
I allow controlled running, if that makes sense. They aren't allowed to run around the main floor of my house, but I let them run laps around the sofa I have in the basement, or I supervise them in doing relay race kind of stuff (like doing crab walks or hopping like bunnies). I also have those bouncing balls with the handles that they can sit on and bounce around. Can't expect these little ones to not be allowed to burn off that excess energy, especially with being unable to spend little or no time outside.

I think gross motor is important and like you said they need to burn off their energy. That being said, I do believe there are productive ways of doing this in an adult led activity not running around in circles or legging it from one end of the room and back with no purpose.

2cuteboys
02-20-2014, 09:43 AM
I also let the kids run. Probably pretty ballsy, since they like to run around my kitchen island and we have slate floors... I don't let the youngest do it, and don't let them do it when he's around and not in a high chair. Other than him the youngest is my son and he's a tough little bugger. Other dck's are almost 3 and almost 4, so I'm not overly worried about injuries, I just get them to put all the toys away before they really start going so they don't trip.

If I want them to stop I usually have to warn them a couple of times and actually set them up with toys to play since they will go right back to running if they aren't engaged. I'll usually do a group story time or puzzles/play doh at the table.

AmandaKDT
02-20-2014, 09:54 AM
I think gross motor is important and like you said they need to burn off their energy. That being said, I do believe there are productive ways of doing this in an adult led activity not running around in circles or legging it from one end of the room and back with no purpose.

I'm not sure if this is a criticism of what I do (one of the problems of things being in written form) but I believe that running just for the sake and joy of running is great and should be encouraged - of course in a supervised way to ensure safety. I am trained in physical education and have taught phys Ed in school. I am also quite strict and the kids know exactly what is allowed and what is not. My home is not a house full of crazy running arounds kids. Not everything has to be a structured adult led activity...in fact, I guess encouraging them to run around the sofa while skipping, hopping, going in slow motion, etc. is a structured activity that develops gross motor skills...so...

bright sparks
02-20-2014, 10:21 AM
I'm not sure if this is a criticism of what I do (one of the problems of things being in written form) but I believe that running just for the sake and joy of running is great and should be encouraged - of course in a supervised way to ensure safety. I am trained in physical education and have taught phys Ed in school. I am also quite strict and the kids know exactly what is allowed and what is not. My home is not a house full of crazy running arounds kids. Not everything has to be a structured adult led activity...in fact, I guess encouraging them to run around the sofa while skipping, hopping, going in slow motion, etc. is a structured activity that develops gross motor skills...so...

Ah yes, written form being misinterpreted. Not a criticism, just my opinion. I also believe that not all activities need to be adult led, but I think it is one thing to run around and have fun independently and quite another to just run around in circles mindlessly. Running in a much wider open space such as a gymnasium or outside space is also different. If going around the sofa while having an adult coax them into skipping, hopping jumping, then I do believe this is much more productive. It is one thing for a 3 or 4 year old to be running around busy in their imagination, chasing butterflies, running from a dragon or playing chase with a friend, but when they are just whizzing around and around and around I still think their are much more constructive ways of gross motor activities and burning off that energy. By adult led, I don't by any means mean constant adult involvement, but maybe adult initiated or adult guided to encourage and promote the learning of skills and safe practice and then sitting back and allowing them to develop self-confidence and independence is a very important part of our role.

godsgirl
02-20-2014, 09:12 PM
Thanks guys! It's frustrating because once I let them walk around following each other it always turns into full out running and somebody ALWAYS gets hurt whether it's them smashing into each other, someone tripping and flying into a kitchen cabinet, other kids getting knocked over, etc. This winter has been absolutely awful which totally makes sense because my group last year started bouncing off the walls too around January. However, these last 2 days have been nice enough for us to go outside and the running has definitely slowed down in the afternoons. C'mon spring!!

daycaremom9
02-22-2014, 12:52 AM
When I find that the kids are running a lot I will have them " practice walking feet". I have them retrace their steps with walking feet. It seems to work, if only temporarily.