3.5k
Daycare and childcare providers in Winnipeg, Toronto, Vancouver, Ontario etc. in CanadaGarderies à Montréal ou au QuébecFind daycare or childcare providers in the USA
Forum control
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Shy
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    31
    Thanked
    10 Times in 3 Posts

    What I have learned from my daycare search....

    I interviewed A LOT of providers. I thought I would post some advice for those starting on their search as I defiantly learned a few things along the way.

    1) Pre-screen and pre-interview
    - Sit down with your significant other and create a list of "must haves"
    - Check websites, ask for contracts to be emailed to you before the interview and quickly run through your "must haves" on the phone before setting up an interview. Don't waste time in the interview asking questions about things you already know (i.e. policy for sick days, operating hours, etc).

    I wasted a lot of time interviewing providers that would have never been a good fit because I didn't take more time with for a quick pre-interview on the phone. I also wasted time in the beginning of my search because I didn't specify pet-free and then found out later my husband was anti-pet in a daycare home (he has trouble trusting other people's dogs).

    2) Insist on current references (at least three) and actually check references
    - Everyone can come up with three people who will say something nice about them, so make sure their references are relevant and current or very recent families.

    My current provider gave me the names and numbers of all the parents whose children were currently in her care, including the family that was leaving and opening up a spot for my son. She also gave me the name and number of two past families who had used her services for five years +. I called all of her references (9 sets of parents total) and they all said very similar things and said she was fantastic (and she is).

    3) IMHO is better to choose someone who is a mother themselves and preferably they have had a home daycare open for 2+ years. This is just personal preference and I'm sure there are many excellent providers with no children and little experience, but I feel like another mother, one experienced in childcare, knows better what to expect and won’t become easily overwhelmed. Childcare is difficult and requires the kind of patience and understanding that only a seasoned mother can summon.

    4) When interviewing you should see the entire daycare area, including the sleeping area and have an eye out for safety issues (like broken gates and toys, hazards, etc). After that you should be asking questions that gain you insights into your potential provider’s personality, behaviours and values. This is why it's important to pre-screen so you already know the essentials. IMHO a provider’s personality and approach towards issues around discipline, potty training, napping, bullying, feeding, self soothing, etc.... is much more important than whether or not they have and ECE diploma, circle-time or tons of toys.
    You want a partner who will work with you, and if you and your provider have very differing view-points on key issues how will you ever work together?
    Ask providers how they approach discipline, what behaviours do they think are not appropriate and their strategies to avoid/address them, how will they assist with potty-training (which should be started at home of course) and how will they address accidents in daycare? How will they communicate with you? Questions like, if my child doesn't like lunch and refuses to eat what will you do? If my child is misbehaving what strategies do you use to address his/her behaviour? If you feel strongly your child should not be punished for potty training accidents but can go a little hungry if they're being picky at lunch time then you should find a provider that feels the same way.
    Remember that there are no right or wrong answers; you are simply looking for someone who is similar to you, within the constraints of providing group care. No provider can give the one-on-one attention or care that you can while they have 4-5 other children so your expectations must be realistic. Additionaly, you will have a hard time finding the right provider if all of your time during the interview is spent on operational questions, like fees and late policies, instead of the stuff that really matters.

    GL!
    Last edited by Marie999; 05-04-2011 at 07:54 PM.

  2. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Marie999 For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Outgoing
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    AB
    Posts
    425
    Thanked
    102 Times in 59 Posts
    I agree with pretty much everything you've said here with the exception of the contract. I do not email my contract to parents...PERIOD! There are a lot of contract stealers out there so my feeling are...if you want my contract, you have to come get it. For actual parents that are interested in care, I prefer to be able to go over things with them. I have a fairly large handbook/contract and it contains a lot of information so I like to be able to explain things right there and then if parents have any questions. I do have a website though and I have a lot of that info on there for parents to read before coming.
    The Daycare Room ~ A forum for providers ~
    http://thedaycareroom.forumotion.ca/

  4. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to fruitloop For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Expansive... Play and Learn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    828
    Thanked
    139 Times in 115 Posts
    I am not a parent, but am a provider with over 8-9 years experience working with children of all ages. PLEASE interview/shop around for a daycare suitable for your child (ren) and yourself! Not every child is fit for a home daycare or for a daycare center. Go with your gut feeling.

    But, I do have to agree that you should have a phone 'interview' first, to have a feeling of the provider. As a provider myself, I decide if I wan to meet with that person, just by talking to them on the phone.

    Don't pick a daycare just based on price - remember, this is your pride and joy that you're sending to another persons home to care for them!

    I would like to mention that the PROVIDER is interviewing the parents. The parents are allowed to ask questions - come prepared with a list. If you decide you want to interview me, I'll give you my nanny rates!

  6. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Play and Learn For This Useful Post:


  7. #4
    Shy
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    31
    Thanked
    10 Times in 3 Posts
    [QUOTE=Play and Learn;2203]
    Don't pick a daycare just based on price - remember, this is your pride and joy that you're sending to another persons home to care for them! QUOTE]

    A very important point, that I forgot to mention!
    5) Don't base any decisions on cost unless your budget makes it ABSOLUTLY impossible to do otherwise.
    -A few dollars more per day is well worth it for a quality provider, especailly since they are underpaid for the service they provide IMO.
    Last edited by Marie999; 05-04-2011 at 07:55 PM.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Marie999 For This Useful Post:


  9. #5
    Expansive... Judy Trickett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    In My Own Little World Of Warped Reality
    Posts
    739
    Thanked
    561 Times in 277 Posts
    Marie............

    I must say, you are a gem. Seriously, you are. I find there are many parents who really don't understand what it is to be a daycare provider and often times, have unrealistic expectations that NO person, provider or otherwise, could meet given the responsibilities of this job and the care and concern of multiple children.

    You are bang on in your advice (with the exception of giving contracts before the interview).
    The reason most providers will not give out contracts before hand is that there ARE start up providers who are not professional who will pose as a parent to get a free contract that they, themselves will not put the work into and create. Sad, but true.

    And, Marie, if you know anything about me, telling you that you are a true gem of a daycare parent is a big thing.

    Your daycare provider is lucky to have you.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to Judy Trickett For This Useful Post:


  11. #6
    Shy
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    31
    Thanked
    10 Times in 3 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Judy Trickett View Post
    Marie............

    I must say, you are a gem. Seriously, you are. I find there are many parents who really don't understand what it is to be a daycare provider and often times, have unrealistic expectations that NO person, provider or otherwise, could meet given the responsibilities of this job and the care and concern of multiple children.

    You are bang on in your advice (with the exception of giving contracts before the interview).
    The reason most providers will not give out contracts before hand is that there ARE start up providers who are not professional who will pose as a parent to get a free contract that they, themselves will not put the work into and create. Sad, but true.

    And, Marie, if you know anything about me, telling you that you are a true gem of a daycare parent is a big thing.

    Your daycare provider is lucky to have you.
    I'll print off your quote and give it to my provider just so she knows what a catch I am!!

    OBVIOUSLY I'm kidding


    Seriously now - Thanks, that's nice of you to say.
    Last edited by Marie999; 05-30-2011 at 09:41 PM.

  12. #7
    Starting to feel at home...
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Waterloo
    Posts
    68
    Thanked
    14 Times in 12 Posts

    you don't have to be a mother to provide good care

    I find it really frustrating when people assume that because I do not have any children of my own yet that I am inexperienced. Having worked at a preschool (specializing in special needs support), camps, volounteered in my church's nursery, as well as having gone through teacher's college, I can safely say that I have PLENTY of experience with children of all ages and more than enough patience. Please do not assume that childcare is the same as parenting. I am not these children's mother. I care about them, I want to see them grow and succeed, and I sincerely hope that in the future they remember me fondly and perhaps even keep in touch. However, I don't believe that any childcare provider would claim to be "mothering" the children in their care. Childcare means being able to handle the needs of many children at once, and to be able to work with children who are very different (different cultures, family types, discipline backgrounds, SES, parenting styles, etc). Not having my own children gives me a few advantages in this case. 1) I do not assume that the children coming into my house will be like mine. I am open to them as individuals. 2) I get peace and quiet and a childfree evening and weekends! Getting a good night sleep and not having to deal with diapers, crying, demands for attention etc after business hours means that I can relax and prepare myself for tomorrow. Don't get me wrong, I'm positive that there are many providers who have children who do a wonderful job (I even know some of them), but please don't discredit me or others who don't have children of their own. There are plenty of teachers and nannies out there who are not parents themselves and for the most part they also do a fabulous job. I realize that this post has been long and I apologize

  13. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to waterloo day mom For This Useful Post:


  14. #8
    Euphoric !
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,405
    Thanked
    239 Times in 191 Posts
    You make some excellent points waterloo day mom.... Admittedly, I would probably have discounted in some way a child-free provider (if I was looking), but after hearing what you have to say, I totally agree with you. Thank you for sharing!

  15. #9
    Expansive... Play and Learn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    828
    Thanked
    139 Times in 115 Posts
    Thanks Waterloo Day Mom - I too, am childless so far - just got married a year ago on Sunday! I have over 10 years working with children in many different settings.

  16. The Following User Says Thank You to Play and Learn For This Useful Post:


  17. #10
    Shy
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    17
    Thanked
    1 Time in 1 Post
    I just need to say that I am not a mother of my own kids I am a step mother of 2 and only have been for 2 years and I disagree with your statement about if the provider is not a mother they can get overwhelmed. Any mother can get over whelmed also just as well as anyone else and just because I am not a mother does not mean that I have no experience or little experience. I could have got my experiences from somewhere else and even have more experiences then a new mother.People go to school to become child care providers and work with children over time to figure out if that is the job that they would like to do.

  18. The Following User Says Thank You to Loyer For This Useful Post:


Similar Threads

  1. Rate search
    By Samantha33 in forum Help & support
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-01-2014, 10:14 PM
  2. Learned my lesson!
    By monkeymama in forum Managing a daycare
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 02-14-2013, 11:07 PM
  3. What have you learned?
    By mom-in-alberta in forum The day-to-day as a daycare provider
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-06-2012, 12:41 PM
  4. Daycare Search - A Parent's Perspective
    By nowmrsg in forum Choosing a daycare
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 04-17-2011, 11:54 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

A few tips...

If you encounter a daycare provider with out-of-date openings / spaces, click on the button right above the currently listed openings to report it!
Updates
We expect providers to keep their listing and available openings up-to-date. However, to prevent oversights, openings expire after 45 days.
Partner in your
search for a daycare provider