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Thread: Milk Allergy

  1. #11
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    One of the children I was referring to above also had a rice allergy among a few other things. Nuts wasn't a problem for at all. I found the rice actually harder to deal with than the milk because rice is used in so many goods to smooth out the texture. She is gone now and it took me 6 months before I remembered I could make rice krispie treats again. You just get into a grove of doing things a certain way. The other thing that was great about the daycare mom was that she was very understanding knowing the worst that was going to happen if I "goofed" was that the child would feel yucky and usually had a diaper blowout as her reaction which was sort of better for me than the throwing up as it was mostly contained. I liked providing the food because then I knew there were no issues as anything on the table was ok for her to eat too. I did have to be the one to provide things like cupcakes for birthdays and things so I could use a recipe with no milk - although I usually opted for big cookies glazed with icing sugar and water mixed and with sprinkles instead which is much more toddler friendly. An allergy doesn't have to mean missing out it just means finding a different way to enjoy.

  2. #12
    I am less concerned about the food being served at the daycare because I can bring my own or entrust the daycare provider to read labels, etc. I more concerned about the fact that kids generally guzzle a ton of milk. There's bound to be milk products around the daycare or milk residue on toys, mats and other areas of the daycare. I can't trust my then 12-month old to be vigilant about not putting other kids' bottles in her mouth. My daughter breaks out in hives just from being at Gymboree and playgroups. Will this be her daily experience at daycare as well?

  3. #13
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    Most daycare providers do not allow the kids to have bottles, sippy cups, etc in the playroom - all food is in the kitchen at the table so it is controlled. Soothers are discouraged after a year at least at my daycare and as soon as possible are for naptime only. Yes there will be some sharing of toys and that can not be helped. You would be doing your child a favour to start now to teach her that toys don't go in the mouth - again something I start after a year and by 15 months it is not allowed. Chewing on toys is for helping the initial teeth to come through. By a year they can exercise their mouths on foods or be given a specific toy they are allowed to chew but it isn't fair to the other kids in care to have to deal with soggy toys either. Those who still put things in their mouths are restricted to one bin of baby stuff for chewing. I started this back when there was so much concern about H1N1 and infants not being immunized and a sudden phobia against germs in general. I was surprised at how quickly most kids gave up the chewing and starting playing in a much more constructive way - it was like they were given permission to grow up. Hands were used to play not hold a toy in the mouth. It was great. While you can't stop other kids from chewing on things you would be helping your daughter to learn to cope by teaching her not to put anything in her mouth except for a certain item which would help to limit coming into contact with the contamination.

    In all of the kids I have known with a milk allergy the response has been gastric rather than hives so no experience in this area. Is it possible that it is something else in a group she is coming into contact with that is causing the hives. Is hives her reaction to milk all the time even at home?

    To avoid the milk issues in the daycare you might try looking for a situation where your child would be the youngest and both the other daycare children and the caregiver's own children were older - closer to age 2 and up. If you go through an agency such as Global or Wee Watch they need to follow age restrictions so there could only be 2 children under age 2 in the daycare so that might be one avenue to check into. Privately a caregiver can have 5 children of any age combination.

    The obvious option is to have someone come into your home so that you know exactly what foods, toys, play areas your child is coming in contact with. Not sure if you could find a short term nanny willing to work say now till Christmas until you have had your allergy appointment and then you can make a future decision based on the outcome.

  4. #14
    Starting to feel at home... dragonlady3's Avatar
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    Good morning...I have recently discovered that one of our day care children has an egg allergy and we have been provided with an epipen. I have alerted all the parents to be careful with any foods they bring in and the same goes for any one who assists me. Our recipes are getting adjusted and we believe we have done 'due diligence'. Nonetheless, I would like to add a layer of protection and ask the child's parents to provide us with a 'waiver' of responsibility. Have any of you had to prepare such a document that you would be willing to share? Thanks.

  5. #15
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    I wouldn't keep the child in my care ... Anything that requires an Epi-pen is way too much responsibility for me. I have one child with a lactose sensitivity and the parent provides the milk but the child can have cheese and yogurt its only when drinking milk that the issue arises so I am okay with it

  6. #16
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    I had a little girl in care with an epipen that I carried everywhere we went. Thank goodness I never had to use it. She had a severe nut allergy so I was always scanning at the park because people feed nuts to the squirrels and shells were everywhere. I didn't actually make up a document for parents but I do think that is a very good idea. The little girl's Mom taught me how to use the epipen with a 'teacher pen' that wasn't real so I wasn't afraid of that and I also carry medical forms everywhere I go in case I have to ever call the paramedics.

    Right now I have a little boy in my daycare who has a milk allergy or something, but it isn't as serious as anaphalactic, we're just trying to figure out what the heck is wrong with his poops and I'm pretty sure the culprit is some type of food.

  7. #17
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    Up until now I have always had a policy of a child with an allergy severe enough to require an epipen ie anaphalactic reaction should be in a daycare centre where there is more than one adult so that one adult can concentrate on the allergic reaction and the other can maintain the safety of the other children. I have had allergies that were gastric reactions with no issues. I currently have a child that has been in care for 4 months and we just weren't giving her peanut butter as is the norm these days but she accidentally got some of her older brother's at home and got hives around her mouth. We had to wait for almost 3 months for testing and she is allergic and now has an epipen but I couldn't bring myself to terminate.

    Also I know that since she hasn't had a reaction in the last three months and her brother still gets it at home that the precautions of washing we are doing are enough for her at least right now. But I have an epipen here and I like that the newer models are a lot easier to use than the old ones I was first trained on.

  8. #18
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    For me, I think it would come down to the severity. My oldest son has a nut allergy. We have been prescribed an epipen, but have never even come close to requiring it, THANK GOD and touch wood. Last year, one of my school age kids was found to have a "tree nut" allergy. He was also given an epipen. I was not going to terminate care for them, though.
    If a parent came and said "my child has a SEVERE allergy to such-and-such. He/she has been hospitalized, we have used the epi in the past, and even trace amounts can cause a reaction...." Eeeek. Too much for me, I think. I would also rather that child be in a group care scenario, as opposed to home daycare. More children, true. But also more adult eyes and hands.
    I wonder if you could google "waiver document" and find an all purpose one that you can amend to suit your needs? Something stating that the provider will make all efforts to ensure an environment safe from the allergen, but in the event that something should happen, it is agreed that the provider WILL not be held personally responsible or liable.

  9. #19
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    Does anybody have a lawyer hubby that could answer the question of liabilty on something like a food allergy. The assumption with anything in daycare is that I will do my best to prevent accidents, injuries, etc. but to what degree are we responsible for preventing an allergic reaction other than doing our best. I mean I would feel awful if anything happened on my watch so to speak but at the same time I can only do so much with what I have to work with - thinking of the discussion above about the milk allergy if another child drools and I did put in my newsletter a reminder to parents about the nut allergy and to please use a bib or change the child's shirt, brush their teeth, wash hands with soap and water etc. if they use peanut butter at breakfast before coming but is it a requirement that I redo the teeth and hands just in case. I mean I would if I smelled peanut butter and let the parent know I was not impressed with their lack of care for the situation but beyond that.

  10. #20
    Starting to feel at home... dragonlady3's Avatar
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    Thanks every body. I will check with Google. The child's doctor has recommended that the family give him small amounts of foods with eggs cooked in, and to keep expanding the amount slowly over time....so I don't think this is life threatening yet. I rarely work alone so there will be 2 more eyes 'on deck'

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