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  1. #1
    Shy Solangio's Avatar
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    Where do you change diapers?

    Dear colleagues,

    I need your advise. As I am new to daycare business, I have tons of wierd questions. One of them is how and where to change diapers. I would avoid changing table as it scares me alot. Can I do in on the floor, using special soft mat on top of protecting sheet? Ikea has it. But how to avoid germs to spread? Do you use wipes only? Where your changing station is? Won's parents be not very much impressed if I do not have changing table?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solangio View Post
    Dear colleagues,

    I need your advise. As I am new to daycare business, I have tons of wierd questions. One of them is how and where to change diapers. I would avoid changing table as it scares me alot. Can I do in on the floor, using special soft mat on top of protecting sheet? Ikea has it. But how to avoid germs to spread? Do you use wipes only? Where your changing station is? Won's parents be not very much impressed if I do not have changing table?
    Ideally you would have a changing table with a mat that has a cover which can be wiped after changing each child. All the better if that can be in a room where there`s a sink for handwashing but not all washrooms have that much space. Just outside would also work. There`s no reason to be scared since you are never leaving a child unattended during a diaper change. What scares you about it?

    Worst case, I guess you could us the mat on the floor but check your provincial requirements first. I know some provinces require the changing area to be in a room with a sink dedicated to handwashing.

    The main things to consider are that you should be washing your hands before and after changing each child. That the surface of the mat must be wiped after changing each child. That you shouldn`t be walking through the house or day care to reach a sink each time a child is changed due to the risk of touching something on route with fecal matter on your hands. Most childhood illnesses are spread by body fluids (coughing, sneezing, fecal matter) which is why hand washing is key to ensure spread of illness is kept to an absolute minimum.

    I don`t think parents will be overly worried if you don`t have a change table due to space restrictions. But being able to show them that the surface their child is changed on is easily disinfected between changes, and that you have easy access to wash your hands are really important.

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  4. #3
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    Please remember this; "you do absolutely everything with your hands", so, I use latex gloves all the time even going to parks, it seems ridiculous but, we do change many times and different children. They're not that expensive and are tax deductible.

    I keep all or at least do all the diaper changes in the bathroom (hygienic reasons)

    Each child has his/hers own changing pad. You can also labeL each, I try to avoid cross contamination. When I go to parks I have only one pad but I carry a few news paper pages in my change bag I just throw in the bag with a dirty diaper that way the mat still clean for the next change. I use also gloves and I carry soapy water and disinfectant. Along with my first aid kit.

    It just made sense to keep a cosy common changing pad, heavy duty cleaning paper, a box of gloves and disinfectant, in the bathroom it makes really easy my work.

    After a change it makes easy to spray and wipe wash his/hers hands and my hands and put all things away. If each child has their own pad makes it easy when one gets too messy you can wash or deal with that later on and not to worry about the other children in need of change, you just go ahead with their own pads. And last deal with the messy one.
    Last edited by Peacefulbird; 04-16-2018 at 06:13 AM.

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  6. #4
    Shy Solangio's Avatar
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    Thank you, ladies! I will then buy changing table and place it near the bathroom, as it’s really small.
    I’m very scared of thinking that wiggly little monkey could slip from my hands, so I never had changing tables with my sons. But I believe if other providers cope, I will, too.

  7. #5
    Expansive... BlueRose's Avatar
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    I use a changing mat on the floor. I don't have room for a changing table, nor do I want to be lifting the kids on and off of one.

    I wear medical disposable gloves when changing the kids. These are provided by the parents

    I only use wipe, provided by the parents.

    I change them in the daycare area.

    Parents don't mind that I don't have a changing table.

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  9. #6
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    I’m the same as bluerose, plasticized change mat on the floor in daycare room. I am not going to risk straining my back to lift kids or risk the liability of a child rolling off a change table. I’ve had lots of kids who actually tantrum and squirm for changes, and I just can’t risk an injury to myself or the child. Always use disposable gloves, and the mat is disinfected after each use. My hands are washed before and after.

  10. #7
    Shy Solangio's Avatar
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    Well, Bluerose and Busy ECE Mommy, I am very much on the same side with you, but I thought I am crazy to think that mat can substitute changing table. Now I am even more confused

    May be I will start with the mat and see if I have to switch to the table.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Solangio View Post
    Well, Bluerose and Busy ECE Mommy, I am very much on the same side with you, but I thought I am crazy to think that mat can substitute changing table. Now I am even more confused

    May be I will start with the mat and see if I have to switch to the table.
    It basically is what is most convenient for you. On the floor or on a change table the consistency comes when disinfecting and leaving it all clear and clean. Some caregivers find hard to change on tables if they have three years olds not potty trained (hard on your back); other's find hard to stay on their knees to change so, it basically depends on you. My only positive advise would be to keep it always clean. I know some parents do not mind but I like to keep it consistent with health practicioners (perhaps just me but once you train yourself that way it pays off, parents also see and recognize the hygienic steps and measures you follow). I have worked in centres and it takes good training steps. Or you can also get sick I remember a friend who got hepatitis from a toodler it was awful with all she had to dealt with, all could this had been prevented by just using gloves. And washing hands thoroughly.

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  13. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Busy ECE mommy View Post
    I’ I am not going to risk straining my back to lift kids or risk the liability of a child rolling off a change table. I’ve had lots of kids who actually tantrum and squirm for changes, and I just can’t risk an injury to myself or the child. Always use disposable gloves, and the mat is disinfected after each use. My hands are washed before and after.
    Try this. Find cute and colourful or interactive little toys, squishy ones, etc. 3 or 4 in a basket (those are only to be used only when changing diapers) once I give a choice of toy they usually are engaged and do not move around. Once it's finished the toy gets also wiped and disinfected. Never had a child moving or squirming around the basket with the especial toys are kept in the bathroom never in the playroom. Most of the time it takes a month or so and they do nit ask for those toys anymore, the children have learned to remain quiet at change time.

  14. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peacefulbird View Post
    It basically is what is most convenient for you. On the floor or on a change table the consistency comes when disinfecting and leaving it all clear and clean. Some caregivers find hard to change on tables if they have three years olds not potty trained (hard on your back); other's find hard to stay on their knees to change so, it basically depends on you. My only positive advise would be to keep it always clean. I know some parents do not mind but I like to keep it consistent with health practicioners (perhaps just me but once you train yourself that way it pays off, parents also see and recognize the hygienic steps and measures you follow). I have worked in centres and it takes good training steps. Or you can also get sick I remember a friend who got hepatitis from a toodler it was awful with all she had to dealt with, all could this had been prevented by just using gloves. And washing hands thoroughly.
    I agree with this totally. For me, getting up and down off my knees endlessly is hard but at almost 60 I guess that is the way it goes. Since I toilet train my children as soon as they are 2 years old, I don't have the issue of large children needed to be lifted on and off a change table.

    I also have the gloves and change them endlessly. It's totally about getting a routine. I literally have mine line up, wash my hands, gloves go on, lift up child, change diaper, wash child's hands, wipe the change mat on the table, dry the change mat, gloves off, wash hands and repeat. Like so much of this job, it's all about routine and soon it becomes second nature.

    I would say that in my experience, children who often wriggle when being changed on the floor, tend not to when elevated on a table. While of course if you turn to grab a new pack of wipes, one hand would remain on the child's tummy to make sure they aren't rolling over or getting up, I find that there's less inclination to do that vs the floor where they want to get back to what they were doing. Perhaps an element of that is also stepping having the table in a location not in the middle of the day care activities too.

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