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  1. #1
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    Dealing with the cold/cough season

    As the cold/cough season is upon us, I would like everyone's opinion on dealing with it.
    I know most of us allow children to stay if they only have a cold or cough. That being said, I have a parent that has been casually sending me texts, after drop off, that she's sent cough syrup, honey, Tylenol, Vicks etc etc, as the child has been coughing all night or has a sore throat or some other ailment. So she's asking if I can give them to the child as needed.
    I'm just thinking that if they need all this stuff, maybe they shouldn't be in care that day. I don't have time to be rubbing Vicks, administering cough meds and such, as we are a busy bunch.
    What are your thoughts?

  2. #2
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    I don’t administer anything unless it is prescription and they have signed a consent form allowing me to administer it. Absolutely no Tylenol or cough medicine will ever be given by me for liability reasons.
    If your child needs fever reducers or meds for pain/discomfort, then they need to stay home.
    I would also be concerned that you were not aware of meds in the children’s bag at drop off. That in itself is a huge liability if another child got into their cubby or bag and you weren’t aware it was there.
    That specific issue became a huge problem at my kids elementary school last year when grade 7 and 8 students had over the counter meds in their lockers and were sharing them with classmates,
    As far as the child being there, the child must be fever free and able to participate in all activities.
    If the cough is of a barking or wheezing or gagging nature, then the child is sent home.

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  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattsmom View Post
    As the cold/cough season is upon us, I would like everyone's opinion on dealing with it.
    I know most of us allow children to stay if they only have a cold or cough. That being said, I have a parent that has been casually sending me texts, after drop off, that she's sent cough syrup, honey, Tylenol, Vicks etc etc, as the child has been coughing all night or has a sore throat or some other ailment. So she's asking if I can give them to the child as needed.
    I'm just thinking that if they need all this stuff, maybe they shouldn't be in care that day. I don't have time to be rubbing Vicks, administering cough meds and such, as we are a busy bunch.
    What are your thoughts?
    No over the counter medications given here either. Some insurances will have clauses about it so check yours. If a child needs medication to get through the day then they are not well enough to fully participate in the program and need to be home.

    We are going outside based on the weather not based on what suits a child who shouldn't be here anyway.

  5. #4
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    Interesting. I'm licensed through an agency.

    And I have forms to sign for giving children their medication. My only request to parents is that the place in a container labeled with name and time, the exact dosis for each time.

    It hardly reaches more than two dosis in a day. If the child is unable to participate extreme sickness or pain then has to be kept at home.

    If I have children coughing we just keep getting well together, hot soups, keeping warm until everyone is good and we start going out in between but just for short periods of time. We pamper ourselves a bit more and then we are ready to start our routine again. I basically work supporting each child and their parents too. Creating a strong group of support between us. A new family thst just joined their daughter started to cough well they pull her out of care for almost 4 days when I asked if it was thst extreme they said not but their other caregiver wouldn't accept her with coughs or runny nose. It seemed to harsh, considering that we live in a winter cold country.

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peacefulbird View Post
    Interesting. I'm licensed through an agency.
    But you still have say in how your business is run since ultimately you are self employed and it's your home/premises.

    And I have forms to sign for giving children their medication.
    Me too. But that's only for prescribed medication for which the doses have been deemed as appropriate for the age of the child. Over the counter meds don't have to be included.

    I basically work supporting each child and their parents too. Creating a strong group of support between us.
    Same here. My client's are amazing and I am part of each child's group. We work together for the success of the child - that doesn't mean that I am grandma and administering meds determined by parents as needed to get through the day. This is ultimately a business, and liability issues are tightly controlled. As much as I love each of my day care children, I don't love them more than my husband and family, and I'm not risking the home we've built together for a client.

    I accept running noses. As long as it's clear and not bright green or yellow with that heavy snot smell because that's a sign of infection which could pass to others. If they have an infection, then the family doctor will prescribe suitable medication and they can return and bring that with clear information. What they cannot do, is bring over the counter meds which they hope will help based on their non-medical degree and self-diagnosis.

    This is what my handbook states :

    Medication
    Written parental consent is required to administer any medication. Medication will only be accepted if prescribed by a doctor. It must be in the original container with clear written instructions. Because more than one adult (home and daycare) will be administering the medication, it is paramount that there is a sheet with the medication, stating the time and amount of medicine given. This makes sure there are no miscommunications which could result in too much medication being given.

    Over the counter medication cannot be accepted or administered under any
    circumstances. This is an insurance based restriction and non-negotiable.

    Please do not send your child to day care with medication mixed into a drink. There is no guarantee that the child will get all of the medication, and there is a risk to other children who might accidentally drink medication which has not been prescribed for them. Dosing and dropping will not be tolerated as it potentially exposes everyone else to illness. It is always apparent when this has occurred as the symptoms return a few hours after drop off.

  7. #6
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    But you still have say in how your business is run since ultimately you are self employed and it's your home/premises.
    Yes Suzie_Homemaker, I still have control of my business but, personally I find that licensing helps me to back up my policies, I have a liability coverage and the agency has insured the group as well. Fortunately, I do not pay for all that support.

    Their policies are written in accordance with the ministry of education policies so, in my case it is easy to follow. I feel that it is kind of standard so it is clear for every family and I.

    Me too. But that's only for prescribed medication for which the doses have been deemed as appropriate for the age of the child. Over the counter meds don't have to be included.*
    Following the agency policy, any medication must be registered prescribed or over the counter, in case of any unexpected reaction they can easily track it.
    that doesn't mean that I am grandma and administering meds determined by parents as needed to get through the day.*
    I absolutely respect on how you run your business and that's why every homedaycare is especial, mine is a bit more flexible. As I have a clear communication with parents I haven't seen any of them bringjng children medicated (without my knowledge), or mixing things in their drinks because I offer everything here so, no drink or food to be brought.

    Our communication is clear, if they tell me that they have given medication earlier then I ask them to either bring the next dosis (name, time and exact dosis) or pick the child when the next dosis is (usually 6 to 8 hrs or in some cases 4 hrs). I rather know than getting a surprise.

    I advertise my program with all benefits children can have (almost same as a centre) but, with a flexibility of a home (more personalized and empathetic) parents can absolutely tell the difference. So, no I don't feel like a "grandma" at home giving medication.

    So far, Suzie_Homemaker I guess your insurance policies and mine and the agencies (I work with) are different. I guess were you are your insurance regulations are more strict, hopefully they don't get that bad here because I like helping families.
    Last edited by Peacefulbird; 11-22-2018 at 08:22 PM.

  8. #7
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    I think our provincial rules are the biggest difference. We are not supposed to take sick children. Our provincial rules are based on the child's ability to fully participate with the daily program which mandates outside time. Our insurance is based on what's legal in our province in terms of number of children coverage will permit and also on the firm restriction of no over the counter meds.

    We MUST have written history of doseage - that avoids Mom giving it, Dad dropped off and being unsure if child has had it and care provider giving a dose (or missing a dose) due to that uncertainty.

    Any situation where there's more than one person giving medication is a higher risk of over dosing or missing doses so the written statement of when meds have been given and amount, eliminates the risk.

    It might be that our insurance regulations are stricter because all day homes, agency or not, pay for their own cover and there's no insurance gain from being with an agency here. The liability is wholly the providers.

  9. #8
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    I think our provincial rules are the biggest difference. We are not supposed to take sick children. Our provincial rules are based on the child's ability to fully participate with the daily program which mandates outside time.
    Yes Suzie_Homemaker here the same regulations apply (I use the Day Nurseries Act. Lately due to changes and updates called CCEYA Doc.) a minimum of 2 hrs daily outdoor time for daycare centres and homedaycares with the exception of going out during extreme heat or cold temperatures.

    My program basically is developed and customized to stay longer periods of time outside only when the temperatures are extreme then we stay. And if i have one or two coughing or runny noses then the outdoor time is less just enough for all to change air and do some exercise (gross motor activities ). I follow the Ontario "Guidelines for Communicable Diseases and Other Childhood Health Issues for Schools and Child Care Centres (CCC)" so that way I'm backed when a child needs to be excluded from my program. With this inf. It doesn't feel like it is only me imposing when a child can or cannot participate. My clients have this inf. So they can clearly read and make a wise decision. Once they get to use this tool is even easier when their child goes to school (so it is standard )

    Our insurance is based on what's legal in our province in terms of number of children coverage will permit and also on the firm restriction of no over the counter meds.*
    Same here, some insurances have become strict but, some are more open to support and work if, an agency is involved (they know that an agency will monitor from time to time and take safety measures and slso an agency have certain procedures to follow in regards of medication administration to a child). Having agencies that support and not charging us for their services is new in Ontario, not many Indendent caregivers have access to that. I'm one of the lucky ones because it also allowed me to have 6 spots.

    We MUST have written history of doseage - that avoids Mom giving it, Dad dropped off and being unsure if child has had it and care provider giving a dose (or missing a dose)
    I keep a journal so any parent inf. (In regards of meds. Administration daily is kept there, is it a simple format:0) and their child doctor also knows because, when they send a prescription it is divided in two containers one for the childcare centre or homedaycare and one for their home (that way they avoid duplication of dosage or forgetting the medication etc) and as mentioned before over the counter meds. Parents follow as directed.

    It might be that our insurance regulations are stricter because all day homes, agency or not, pay for their own cover and there's no insurance gain from being with an agency here. The liability is wholly the providers.
    It must be hard to work like that it feels like you do not have any one backing you up. It must feel like all the responsibility is over your shoulders. Now I know why you have to protect yourself as much as you can. It must be stressful to work under that conditions, I just imagine that.

    Thank you Suzie_Homemaker, you gave a great in site on how other province homedaycares or day homes operate. Hopefully some day it all becomes standard and unifie us towards helping more families with a reasonable laws and regulations back up.

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